6 Things to Consider When Hiring a Mother’s Helper


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With summer starting soon, and Mr. O and I both having work from home jobs, we’re closely looking at the possibility of hiring a mother’s helper.

I’ll admit that I had no idea what a mother’s helper’s job is.  I mean, I’m home, so what does she do?  Isn’t it awkward?

A mother's helper can be a great way to lighten your load while still keeping your kids home. Here are some things to consider before you start your search.

So, I started looking into it, and it turns out that mother’s helpers are kind of a genius idea.  Anyone who has kids knows it’s very difficult to accomplish anything while they’re home, especially if you’re the only adult.  Between snacks, and drinks, and games to play, and gross things they find, and pictures they want to show you… there’s a non-stop flow of interruptions that could push a parent over the edge.

Enter the mother’s helper.

What does a Mother’s Helper do?

This is really up to you.  A mother’s helper can be responsible for any number of things that will make things easier for you.

Light housework.  A mother’s helper is not a maid.  They should not be cleaning your house from top to bottom.  But they can do some simple chores like dishes or folding laundry that you just can’t get to.

Meal prep.  They can make sandwiches or simple meals for your little one, or the whole family.  Keep in mind that a mother’s helper is usually a younger child, so anything you ask them to make should be age appropriate.

Child care.  Do you need a couple hours to get the housework done or just sit and write your blog?  A mother’s helper can keep your cherub entertained while you do what you need to do.

Special Considerations

Transportation.  Mother’s helpers aren’t typically of babysitting age, and certainly not of driving age, so they’ll need a way to get back and forth to your house.  Kids in the neighborhood are a good option for this reason – they can walk!

Payment.  While mother’s helpers don’t make as much as a babysitter, especially if you’re the first family they’ve worked for, they’re not slave labor.  Count on paying $3-5 an hour, depending on your area, and will go up as she takes on more responsibility.

Allergies.  My house is a very nut-laiden house.  We have peanut butter, nut bars, and I’m sure other things, too.  There’s a very good chance of coming contact with some form of nuts at my house, so kids with nut allergies wouldn’t be a good fit.

The nice thing about hiring a mother’s helper is that they will eventually grow up and be a great babysitter, one you’ve trained the way you like and is familiar with all your household routines.

Have you ever hired a mother’s helper?  Share your experience in the comments.

A mother's helper can be a great way to lighten your load while still keeping your kids home. Here are some things to consider before you start your search.

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